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The Complete Guide to Windows 8

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Windows users will be familiar with the startling shock of the new that greeted migrants from Windows 3.1 to 95. And it’s fair to say that the transition from Windows 7 to 8 is as big a step, if not bigger. Be prepared for a surprise. Microsoft has designed Windows 8 from the ground up as an operating system that’s equally at home on a desktop PC, laptop and tablet. It bears an uncanny resemblance to the interfaces of both Windows Phone 7 and Xbox 360. It is, in short, a platform that could be your constant companion from the morning commute to your evening’s entertainment, via a few hours’ work in the office or on the move. Steve Jobs may have been a little premature in declaring the traditional PC dead, it’s no secret that an increasing amount of our computing these days takes place on the hoof. There is a a plethora of new computing devices, from smartphones and tablets, to thin-and-light laptops. There’s a computer for every situation, and the desktop is becoming the odd one out. With Google and Apple taking big bites out of the portable market, Microsoft needs Windows to become a viable mobile and tablet platform. Imagine files and settings on your laptop at home replicated on your tablet as you travel to work, and accessed again from your office PC. The same information, presented in the same bespoke way on every device. If you are already a Windows user, being able to extend your desktop experience to other screens is a compelling idea, you’ll agree.
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  8 U p d a t e d f o r  2 0 1 3 !  Windows The Complete Guide to Packedwithtipsandtricks  fromtheExpertsat FOR YOUR LAPTOP, PC & TABLET What’snewinWindows8EveryfeatureexplainedEasyWindowsupgradesHowtogetWindows8todaySecretextrasinWindows8Werevealhiddengems  1 issue£2.491 year£19.996 months£14.99 Don’t miss a single copy of PC Advisor  by subscribing digitally EXPERT ADVICE YOU CAN TRUST UK’S TOP 100 TECH PRODUCTS I   nexpensive PCs that do it all from £420Best budget laptops &all-in-ones revealediMac alternativesthat cost much less ISSUE 208 NOV 2012 Get 3D on yourlaptop, PC, TV How to play3D games, watchmovies, view photosforFREE Faster Wi-Fiin every home ãHow to improveyourwirelessnetwork ãPLUS: HomePlug networking grouptestãNEW: First 802.11AC routerstested Protect your privacy Who isspying onyou, and how to hidefromtrackers PA VE diital.indd 11 1:1 EXPERT ADVICE YOU CAN TRUST 1 ISSUE 207 OCT 2012 UK’S TOP 100 BEST BUYS REVEALED   ã Next-gen Ivy Bridge portable PCsã Laptops, tablets & PCs for every budget TESTED:  The best laptops you can buy Slay yourenemieswith26 powerhousePCsfrom£500 UK’s Best3D TVs TestedGaming PCsGroup Test Sony, LG, Panasonic, Samsung ,Toshiba&more 50 Time-Saving Tips Simple, freewaysto getmorefromyourcomputer ãWindowsãGoogleãEmail ãMobile 2 8  l a p t o p s f r o m  £ 2 5 0  PA VE IIAL.indd 11 11:1   EXPERT ADVICE YOU CAN TRUST 50 LAPTOPS AND PCs REVIEWED INSIDE ãProtect yourlaptop, tablet &phoneãSet upa Powerlinenetwork ãBuild a websiteinminutesãGet morefromMS Word   Thebest phonesyoucanbuyinoursmartphonegrouptest WINDOWS 8 THE REVIEW  The most in-depth Windows 8 review you can readEvery new feature examinedSpeed up any PCfor just £25Fully tested The pros and cons of upgrading ãGreat gadgetsforany budgetãGoogleNexusvsSamsungãBest 7in&10intabletstested ISSUE 209 DEC 2012  09diital.indd 7090 0:38  Welcome to Windows 8 f you were there, you will remember the launch of Windows 95. Microsoft spent around $300 million promoting that release, spending a small fortune on the Rolling Stones’ musical midlife crisis Start Me Up , and lighting the Empire State Building in Windows’ colours. But even if you can’t recall the fanfare, long-term Windows users will be familiar with the startling shock of the new that greeted migrants from Windows 3.1 to 95. And it’s fair to say that the transition from Windows 7 to 8 is as big a step, if not bigger. Be prepared for a surprise. Microsoft has designed Windows 8 from the ground up as an operating system that’s equally at home on a desktop PC, laptop and tablet. It bears an uncanny resemblance to the interfaces of both Windows Phone 7 and Xbox 360. It is, in short, a platform that could be your constant companion from the morning commute to your evening’s entertainment, via a few hours’ work in the office or on the move.Why has Microsoft done this? Quite simply, it can’t afford not to. Although Steve Jobs may have been a little premature in declaring the traditional PC dead, it’s no secret that an increasing amount of our computing these days takes place on the hoof. We all expect to be able to communicate, create and consume wherever we are. This has led to a plethora of new computing devices, from smartphones and tablets, to thin-and-light laptops. There’s a computer for every situation, and the desktop is becoming the odd one out. With Google and Apple taking big bites out of the portable market, Microsoft needs Windows to become a viable mobile and tablet platform. The good news for Microsoft is that it already owns desktop computing, and Windows 8 is designed so that your account on one device can be accessed from another. Imagine that: files and settings on your laptop at home replicated on your tablet as you travel to work, and accessed again from your office PC.  The same information, presented in the same bespoke way on every device. If you are already a Windows user, being able to extend your desktop experience to other screens is a compelling idea, you’ll agree. So despite the fact that it’s a steep learning curve, I’m excited about Windows 8. And I hope after reading The Complete Guide to Windows 8  you will be, too.I’d love to hear your thoughts about this magazine and Windows 8, so do feel free to drop me a line at matt_egan@idg.co.uk with any comments. EDITORIAL Editor Matt Egan 020 7756 2870 matt_egan@idg.co.uk  Managing editor Rob Woodcock Cover design/ srcinal photography Dominik Tomaszewski  ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTORSEdward N Albro, Rosemary Hattersley, Chris Martin, Jim Martin, Nate Ralph, Sandra Vogel PRODUCTION Head of production Richard Bailey 020 7756 2839 richard_bailey@idg.co.uk CIRCULATION & MARKETING Marketing manager Ash Patel  Ash_Patel@idg.co.uk PUBLISHING Publishing director Simon Jary  simon_jary@idg.co.uk  Managing director Kit Gould  The Complete Guide to Windows 8 is a publication of IDG Communications, the world’s leading IT media, research and exposition company. With more than 300 publications in 85 countries, read by more than 100 million people each month, IDG is the world’s leading publisher of computer magazines and newspapers. IDG Communications, 101 Euston Road, London NW1 2RA. This is an independent journal not affiliated with Microsoft, or any other company other than IDG. All icons and images are registered trademarks of the respective trademark owner. All contents © IDG 2012. Printed by Wyndeham Roche CONTACTS Matt Egan, Editor Twitter: @MattJEganEmail: matt_egan@idg.co.uk  I WELCOME:  MATT EGAN THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO WINDOWS 8   3
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