of 15

TCI Cluster Evaluation Working Group Cluster Efforts in Ireland. Presented By: Dr John Hobbs & Eileen Crowley, Dept. of Management & Enterprise, CIT

4 views15 pages

Download

All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
TCI Cluster Evaluation Working Group Cluster Efforts in Ireland Presented By: Dr John Hobbs & Eileen Crowley, Dept. of Management & Enterprise, CIT Introduction Origins of Clustering In Ireland Context
TCI Cluster Evaluation Working Group Cluster Efforts in Ireland Presented By: Dr John Hobbs & Eileen Crowley, Dept. of Management & Enterprise, CIT Introduction Origins of Clustering In Ireland Context for Clustering Bottom up Clustering Diversification of Approaches Current Situation and Opportunity Cluster Analysis, Mapping, Visualisation and Internationalisation Interreg Europe - 4th Call Project Proposal of Interest? Origins of Clustering In Ireland Michael Enright engaged as advisor to the Industrial Policy Review Group, established in 1991 under the chairmanship of Jim Culliton to make recommendations on the future direction Irish industrial policy should take. The Culliton (1992) report identified a range of areas requiring reform in order to create an environment more conducive to industrial development The budget for assisting indigenous industry will focus particularly on segments or clusters where there is a basis for establishing or increasing a national competitive advantage (DETE, 1993, p 7). Origins of Clustering in Ireland National Economic and Social Council (NESC) The National Economic and Social Council (NESC) reports to the Taoiseach on strategic issues for Ireland s economic and social development. It provides a forum for multilateral dialogue on economic, social and environmental challenges. NESC (1993) report A Strategy for Competitiveness, Growth and Employment, to strengthen Ireland s indigenous industrial base. highlighted the benefits of clusters and advocated the creation of co-operative structures among small firms as a means of achieving some of the economies of scale available to large firms. Cooke (1996) titled Networking for Competitive Advantage, experience of interfirm cooperation elsewhere in Europe, NESC (1997), titled Clusters in Ireland, ended up recommending against basing indigenous industrial development on a cluster policy. NESC (1998), titled Sustaining competitive advantage, concluded that Irish cluster examples cannot be regarded as part of fully-developed industry clusters of the type and scale described by Porter. Origins of Clustering In Ireland Whilst the NESC reports differed in their attitudes towards clusters, further support for the concept had come from another authoritative source: the 1995 report of the Science, Technology and Innovation Advisory Council STIAC. Strongly recommended network formation and clustering as the most effective means of promoting innovation among Irish firms. Meanwhile, in their routine multi-annual strategy statements, industry development agencies make no reference to the cluster concept e.g. Forbairt (1994) The Forbairt Mission ; Forfas (1996) Shaping Our Future: A Strategy for Enterprise in Ireland in the 21st Century ; EI (1998) Enterprise Ireland: Strategy and Forfas (1996) A new strategy for the promotion of enterprise in Ireland in the 21st century. Breathnach (2001, p 12) believes that clusters occupy only a very marginal place in the overall thrust of Irish industrial development policy. Origins of Clustering In Ireland More than a decade after the NESC studies, and in flat contradiction of Clancy et al. s (2001) findings, Ireland was said to be home to a number of industry clusters (DETE, 2008). A DETE (2008) report entitled: Knowledge and Enterprise Clusters in Ireland, describes three Irish clusters: 1. Bio Pharma 2. Internationally traded Services 3. ICT However, to date no specific cluster policy developed at a national level. Context for Clustering In Ireland Supports Foreign Enterprise in Ireland Supports Indigenous Enterprise in Ireland Capital & Employment R&D / Innovation Grants Tax Credits Business Asset Grant Innovation Vouchers Research Commercialisation Innovation Partnership Programme Technology Gateways Context for Clustering In Ireland Context for Clustering In Ireland Bottom up Clustering Diversification of Approaches Now have a situation where some organisations see the value in a clusters and have tried to develop independent of national policy. Current Situation and Opportunity No structured programmes No definition of a cluster / cluster organisation etc. Disjointed approach and this leads to the difficulties already outlined Ideal situation is that national policy is supportive of national cluster organisations and provides financial support for same. However, a bottom up solution may be where a local authority, national agency, university invested to support a cluster organisation designed on the Catalan / Danish / Swedish model perhaps hosted by a university / IOT. Were a cluster to be developed in this manner - analysing the benefits, benchmarking success and recording failures over a month period, would showcase the opportunity of investing in a national clustering policy. Visualisation of Linkages in Networks and Clusters Cluster / Eco-system Analysis Internationalisation Strategies Analyse Value Chain, Knowledge, Economic Policy and Support Linkages Provide a critical evidence base for cluster initiatives Cluster B2B Connect Platforms Analyse International Connections from a Cluster with V-LINC Current Exports with Market research C2C Workshops Sharing Cluster Best Practices / Workshops Delivered Cluster Seminar Series / Cluster Development Workshops - 4 th Call Project Proposal Foundation - Building regional resilience to industrial structural change SME competitiveness Objective 2.1: Improving SMEs competitiveness policies Seeking Partners from: across Europe Public including a Regional/ local authorities Organisations supporting entrepreneurship, clustering, business innovation - with policy influence Closing 22 nd June 2018 Across Europe public bodies are pressed by an increasing need to provide preparatory support to the economic ecosystem in advance of the closure of anchor firms in their region which act as significant employers. Impacts of a closure go beyond direct employees and ripple, wave like throughout the regional services sector and economy. Management of such anticipated structural change requires proactive renewal of business approaches and policy supports. Regions are encouraged to introduce pilot projects based on their own strengths and to provide appropriate business supports for the re-alignment of the regional industrial base. This proactive approach by regional stakeholders is critical to building the resilience of these regions and enabling them to adapt to change. As no handbook or roadmap for anticipated structural change exists, the development of this collaborative Interreg Europe project linking partners across borders will seek to address this issue. Interested Contact: Eileen Crowley Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland (Éire), T: E: - 4 th Call Project Proposal INCLUDE (Inclusive Cluster Development for sustainable Europe) SME competitiveness Objective 2.1: Improving SMEs competitiveness policies Seeking Partners from: across Europe Public bodies, regional /local authorities, managing authorities. Cluster organisations seeking to learn or share knowledge in relation to inclusive cluster practices Closing 22 nd June 2018 Recognising and tackling inequality and disadvantage is imperative for the future health & sustainability of our economy, society & environment across Europe. Growing inequality left untackled will greatly damage regional competitiveness. Cluster based development strategies are proven an effective intervention for change in disadvantaged communities when they partner with local training and development programmes. Inclusive cluster based programmes are increasingly adopted by cities and regions as a means to ensure inclusion and diversity is central to their economic growth strategy. This project will seek to share knowledge and experience between regions in relation to inclusive cluster initiatives and practices and to inform policy creation which supports sustainable and inclusive economic development, thus supporting regional competitiveness. Interested Contact: Eileen Crowley Cork Institute of Technology, Ireland (Éire), T: E: Many Thanks for your Attention Looking forward to a productive few days and learning from collective experience Dr John Hobbs, Senior Lecturer, Economics V-LINC Research Group Cork Institute of Technology E: Tel Eileen Crowley Research Fellow Economics V-LINC Research Group Cork Institute of Technology E: Tel
Advertisement
MostRelated
View more
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks