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Mtoe China India Other developing Asia Russia Middle East Rest of world OECD Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2011 Mtoe
Mtoe China India Other developing Asia Russia Middle East Rest of world OECD Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2011 Mtoe AddiGonal to Oil Coal Gas Renewables Nuclear Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2011 Billion dollars (2010) Biofuels Electricity Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2011 TWh Global renewable electricity production and forecast OECD Americas OECD Asia-Oceania OECD Europe China Brazil India Rest of non-oecd Source: IEA Renewable Energy Medium- term Market Report 80 60 Number of countries with installed capacity above 100 MW Non-OECD OECD Onshore wind Offshore wind Bioenergy Solar PV CSP Geothermal Ocean Source: IEA Renewable Energy Medium- term Market Report n Global capacity will triple to 230 GW in 2017 (conserva9ve) GW 250 Global solar PV capacity forecast Germany China US Japan Italy RoW Source: IEA Renewable Energy Medium- term Market Report n Global capacity will grow six- fold to 11 GW in 2017 GW 12 Global CSP capacity forecast US Spain China India Morocco RoW Source: IEA Renewable Energy Medium- term Market Report The New Policies Scenario: IEA s central scenario; it takes account of both exisgng government policies and declared policy intengons. Mtoe Other renewables Biomass Hydro Nuclear Gas Coal Oil Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2011 New Zealand Netherlands 1% United States 10% Poland United Kingdom Czech Republic 0% 17% 8% Sweden 30% Greece Austria Finland 17% Turkey 0% Germany Hungary 16% Portugal 0% Switzerland Italy 0% Spain Slovak Republic 22% Ireland 0% France Belgium Japan Luxembourg Korea 0% 15% 22% Self sufficiency =inland production / tpes (2010 estimates) IEA 11% n 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Renewables Fossil fuels Nuclear Source: IEA Nuclear energy is an important op;on on energy mix for countries which have low energy self- sufficiency ra;o, namely which have scarce domes;c energy resource. 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Water power Wind power Geo- thermal * PV, etc * ** CombusGbles/Waste** Switzerland Chile Portugal Finland Austria Sweden Norway New Zealand Iceland Denmark Slovenia Estonia Canada Poland Greece Hungary France Germany Italy Mexico Turkey Spain United Kingdom Netherland Ireland Belgium Israel Australia United States Czech Slovakia Korea Luxembourg Japan In 2010 * Including Tidal, wave and ocean power ** Such as biomass, biogas, renewable waste Share of renewables in Japan s primary energy supply is compara;vely lower among IEA member countries. Source: IEA Changes in Electric Power Supply by Renewable Energy M E T I Agency for Natural Resources and Energy n Since the introducgon of the RPS system in 2003, electric power supply by renewable energy has doubled. n Moreover, since the surplus electricity purchase system was introduced in 2009, the introducgon of residengal photovoltaic power generagon has largely increased. Long- term change in total supply from power- genera9ng facili9es of new energy, etc. (100 million kwh) FY 2003 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV Beginning of RPS System FY 2004 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV FY 2005 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV FY 2006 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV FY 2007 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV FY 2008 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV ResidenGal PV FY 2009 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV Beginning of purchasing residengal surplus electricity FY 2010 Wind Hydraulic Biomass PV ResidenGal PV 1) This data shows electricity supply from faciliges accredited by the RPS Law. Electric energy before the RPS Law was enacted, electric energy generated by faciliges that are not currently accredited by the RPS Law, and electric energy that is generated by faciliges accredited by the RPS Law and consumed in- house are not included in this data. 2) Photovoltaic faciliges that have been covered by the surplus electricity purchase system since November 2009 are calculated as specific PV. Basic Mechanism of the Feed- in Tariff Scheme M E T I Agency for Natural Resources and Energy n Under the feed- in tariff scheme, if a renewable energy producer requests an electric uglity to sign a contract to purchase electricity at a fixed price and for a long- term period guaranteed by the government, the electric uglity is obligated to accept this request. Those engaged in the power generagon business using renewable energy sources Solar PV Sale of electricity produced from renewable energy sources Electric uglity Electricity supply Wind power Small- and medium- scale hydraulic power Biomass Purchase of electricity at a fixed price for a government guaranteed period Payment for the purchase cost Submission of the collected surcharge Surcharge adjustment organizagon (organizagon to collect and distribute the surcharge) CollecGon of surcharge together with the electricity charge Electricity customers Geothermal power Deciding tariffs and duragons, respecgng the opinion of the special commigee (every fiscal year) Decision of surcharge unit price per kwh (every fiscal year) Those who generate power at home Approval of faciliges (Government confirms whether the facility can generate electricity stably and efficiently. The approval is cancelled when the facility no longer sagsfies the requirements.) Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Opinion on tariffs and duragon Special commigee for determinagon of tariff s and duragons Government Renewable Energy Forecast (FY2012) M E T I Agency for Natural Resources and Energy n EsGmaGng based on officially announced projects and recent trend, approximately 2.5GW renewable energy faciliges would be installed in this fiscal year.currently about 19.45GW renewable capacity expects to increase to about 22GW.) Renewable energy installa9on forecast in FY 2012 Already installed capacity by FY2011 Forecast of newly installed capacity in FY2012 Residen9al PV Approx. 4GW + Approx 1.5GW 40% increase from new installagon in 2011) Non- Residen9al PV Approx. 0.8GW +Approx 0.5GW EsGmate by METI Wind Approx. 2.5GW Approx 0.38GW 50 % increase from recent annual installagon) Small and Medium scaled hydro 1MW to 3MW Small and Medium scaled hydro Less than 1MW Approx. 9.35GW Approx. 0.2GW Approx 0.02GW EsGmate by METI Approx 0.01GW 50 % increase from recent annual installagon) Biomass Approx. 2.1GW Approx 0.09GW 50 % increase from recent annual installagon) Geothermal Approx. 0.5GW 0GW Total Approx GW Approx 2.5GW InnovaGve Strategy for Energy and the Environment (Outline) (1) M E T I Agency for Natural Resources and Energy 1. RealizaGon of a society not dependent on nuclear power (1) 3 guiding principles towards realizagon of a society not dependent on nuclear power 3 guiding principles Strictly apply the sgpulated rules regarding forty- year limitagon of the operagon. Restart the operagon of nuclear power plants once the Nuclear Regulatory Commission gives safety assurance. Not to plan the new and addigonal construcgon of a nuclear power plant. The Government will mobilize all possible policy resources to such a level as to even enable zero operagon of nuclear power plants in the 2030 s. As its first step, the Framework for Green Development Policy by the end of this year. (2) 5 policies towards realizagon of a society not dependent on nuclear power The nuclear fuel cycle policy Maintaining and strengthening human resources and technology CooperaGon with the internagonal community Strengthening measures for local areas with nuclear power faciliges Systems of nuclear power projects and the liability system for nuclear- related damages (3) Review of the path towards a society not dependent on nuclear power Review and constantly re- examine the path towards realizagon of a society not dependent on nuclear power in order to be sufficiently flexible and responsive to any unforeseen changes in the future InnovaGve Strategy for Energy and the Environment (Outline) (2) M E T I Agency for Natural Resources and Energy 2. RealizaGon of green energy revolugon Compose the Framework for Green Development Policy by the end of this year. Electricity Saving: Reduce more than 110BWh by FY 2030 Energy Saving: Reduce more than 72 million kl by FY 2030 Renewables: Develop more than 300BWh by FY 2030 (All compared with FY 2010) 3. For ensuring stable supply of energy Intensive use of thermal power generagon Intensive use of heat such as the introducgon of co- generagon systems of 150 BWh Technologies related to the next generagon energy Stable and inexpensive securement and supply of fossil fuels 4. Bold implementagon of reform of electric power system (Compose the Strategy for the Reform of Electricity Power Systems (tentagve) by the end of this year) 5. Steady implementagon of global warming countermeasures (Formulate the Global Warming AcGon Plan for the period from aoer 2013 by the end of this year) Disclose informagon in a detailed manner through a process that will sufficiently ensure transparency and review and constantly re- examine them Power grid in Japan M E T I Agency for Natural Resources and Energy Hydro Gas Coal GeneraGng company Hokkaido Oil Nuclear Other In- house generagon Power uglity company Tohoku Chugoku Kansai Hokuriku Tokyo Kyushu Shikoku Okinawa Chubu Source: UK 75.5GW 0.5GW 2GW 2GW France 110.9GW 2.4GW Belgium 15.8GW 3.2GW 2.7GW 3.2GW Netherland 19.8GW 2.4GW 3.6GW 3.5GW 3GW Germany 129.1GW Norway 29.8GW 3.9GW 0.6GW 3.6GW Sweden 32.6GW 0.6GW Spain 93.5GW 1.3GW 1GW 2.6GW 1.1GW 1.8GW Switzerland 17.9GW 1.5GW 1.2GW : Maximum Capacity : Maximum interchange power Italy 93.1GW 4.2GW 0.5GW 0.3GW 0.2GW 2GW Austria 18.9GW 2.2GW Source: IEA Electricity InformaGon 2010 IndicaGve value for Net Transfer CapaciGes (NTC) in ConGnental Europe Deregula9on and systemic issues that need to be addressed in order to popularize the use of renewable energy Type of regula9on/related legisla9on Agricultural Land Act Agricultural Land Promo9on Act MAFF Allowing Type 1 agricultural land that is no longer being farmed to be used for renewable energy genera9on Issues rela9ng to deregula9on and systems Currently, private- sector companies other than the na9on s nine electric power u9li9es are not allowed to u9lize large areas of Type 1 agricultural land for non- farming purposes. Regula9ons on Loca9on Na9onal Forests Act Public Accoun9ng Act Forest Act Natural Parks Act Hot Springs Law Forestry Agency Ministry of Finance Forestry Agency Ministry of the Environmen t Ministry of the Environmen t Allowing private- sector electric power companies and geothermal steam- produc9on companies to rent sate- owned forest or moorland Delis9ng protected forests and laying down concrete rules for the gran9ng of licenses to use such forests for energy projects Ending the prohibi9on of surveying and drilling within special areas in na9onal parks for the purpose of using geothermal energy to generate electric power Redrading the drilling permission standards on a strict scien9fic basis Currently, private- sector companies other than the na9on s nine electric power u9li9es are not allowed to conclude discre9onary contracts for the ren9ng of areas in na9onal forests for purposes that are not classified as public works. Procedures for the delis9ng of protected forests oden do not proceed because local authori9es are unwilling to take ac9on due to a lack of precedents, and because the central government strictly requires the submission of proof that there are no other suitable candidate sites for development. In special areas within na9onal and quasi- na9onal parks, geothermal energy development projects are effec9vely prohibited. The meaning of the statement found within the standards for gran9ng licenses to drill for hot spring resources when it is deemed that [the drilling] will affect the volume of steam released by the hot spring resources, the temperature of the resources, and/ or their mineral cons9tuents is unclear, and consequently permission is seldom granted. Factory Loca9on Act METI Exemp9ng photovoltaic power genera9on site from applica9on of the area restric9ons applied to produc9on facili9es, and revising the greenery set- aside requirements Because photovoltaic power genera9on sites are classified as produc9on facili9es, the regula9ons allow the photovoltaic panels to be laid on only up to 50% of the total site area, and the developer must also set aside a certain percentage of the land for greenery. Safety Regula9ons Fire Service Act Building Standards Act Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communica 9ons Ministry of Land, Infrastructur e, Transport and Tourism Amending the regula9ons the Fire Service Act with respect to lithium- ion baneries Crea9on of a system regula9ng the construc9on of offshore wind farms (debate on the appropriate structural criteria) The electroly9c solu9on used in baneries is classed as a dangerous substance under the law, and thus in the event of the storage or installa9on of baneries above a certain volume limit, the owners are required to take an9- fire measures (such as construc9ng fire walls) out of all propor9on to any actual poten9al danger. The structural criteria that developers of offshore wind farms are required to apply (structural strength, rollover resistance, etc.) are unclear. Summary n In a world full of uncertainty, one thing is sure: rising incomes & popula9on will push energy needs higher n Concerning primary energy demand, renewables are the most incremental among energy sources. Along with this, subsidies for renewables will increase. n Global solar power genera9on (PV+CSP) will more than triple by 2017 n Introduc9on of renewables will accelerate in Japan owing to the FIT scheme. n Challenges for Japan to further disseminate renewables are: Reinforcement of power grid and deregula9ons
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